Mastering Emotional Intelligence Seminar/workshop

Date:20/07/2017 (09:30 – 16:30)

This one-day course will help you develop your emotional intelligence (EI) skills and enhance leadership skills for every member of staff or an individual, allowing them to therefore be more productive and profitable.

No matter what type of business you are in – part of a multinational or a sole trader or somewhere in between – and whether your business is highly automated, virtual, hardly ever meet people face to face or you are surrounded by people, clients and colleagues all day, to be highly successful and maximise your productivity research shows you need to have emotional intelligence.

The digital age is dramatically reshaping the rules for business success. The new context demands renewal of your capabilities and development of a different mindset.

The skills you gain from this course are transferable, they are not just for business but also they will enhance your personal life.

Course Outcomes:  
In this course, you’ll learn the different components of emotional intelligence at work. For example, you’ll learn how you can work effectively in teams, build cooperative relationships with your key stakeholders, exercise effective influence, handle difficult conversations, and create energy and enthusiasm to foster success.

It will help you to have a better understanding of how to make healthy choices based on the ability to identify, understand, and manage your own feelings and the feelings of others.

Really, it’s being able to understand what your emotional experience is, to be able to understand other people’s emotional experience – and then to be able to use that information to inform choices.

With EI you also be able to form positive relations with peers, bosses, senior leaders, people at all levels or your business and relevant others outside the organisation. When there is mutual trust, influence and credibility, organizational work becomes easier. (Harvard Business Review)

In this short advanced seminar, you will be taught how use emotional intelligence through presentations, discussion, fun and interactive activities.

This course will be delivered by Andrew Farquharson, who, after many years of working in education, runs his own consultancy delivering seminars, workshops on building business confidence, resilience and emotional intelligence.

Andrew has delivered training and seminars to many organisations, including Education Scotland, Edinburgh Chamber of Commerce, various local authorities and schools. Andrew has also delivered the Thrive Programme in, amongst other countries, Iceland, Norway, Finland and Mexico.

Location:
Edinburgh Chamber of Commerce
40 George Street
Edinburgh
MIDLOTHIAN
EH2 2LE

If you would like more information contact Andrew: andrew@thriveinscotland.co.uk

To register/book a place contact Edinburgh Chamber of Commerce.

 

Leadership and the Bounce, Thrive Programme in Education

“Treat a man as a he is and he will remain as he is. Treat a man as he can and should be and he shall become as he can and should be.” Goethe.

All educationalist are leaders, good and effective leadership supports and develops colleagues and learners. Asking the right questions, flexibility, empowering colleagues and learners are the hallmarks of good leadership. Effective leadership reduces anxiety and stress in colleague and learners.

Bounce, Thrive Programme in Education is a proven way to develop a growth mind-set, self-confidence, resilience and emotional intelligence. Bounce, strengthens the psychological immune system of the learner.

Good leadership, no matter at what level, enable learners, colleagues and schools to thrive. The Thrive programme allows establishments to demonstrate that they are providing opportunities to meet the individual needs of students. (GIRFEC). The Thrive Programme is a very cost effective way to raise attainment and close the educational gap by enabling more effective leadership.

HOW I HELPED MYSELF THRIVE

Blog from main Thrive Programme site: I suspect my story is a familiar one, sadly. I say sadly only in retrospect, because right now I’m feeling great and living something approaching the life I’ve always aimed for, but never quite managed to grasp in my previous two decades of adult life. This was mainly due to my poor mental health, lack of coping skills and wholly negative outlook on life. My glass wasn’t half empty… it was drier than the Sahara!

I’d always experienced strong depressive feelings and thoughts, and carried other baggage – low self-esteem and poor sleep patterns – around with me too, so in the mid-00s I made a concerted effort to get ‘better’. This involved the usual confessional trips to the GP and subsequent referrals to whatever local services were deemed most likely to help – a combination of irregular NHS counselling, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and strong anti-depressants. The doctor would then tell me to come back in a few weeks when the drugs will have kicked in and I should be feeling better.

Except I didn’t get better. CBT was comically ineffective and the medication made very little difference to my daily outlook and caused numerous problems relating to side-effects. For example, a few days after starting one treatment course, I was on a first date with a gorgeous young lady… who was no doubt surprised when, after a great evening of successfully presenting myself as ideal boyfriend material, I came within a millisecond of physically assaulting a traffic warden who’d quite rightly given me a ticket. Note: whatever the opposite of a ‘fighter’ is, that’s me. I don’t do violence. So I wasn’t too surprised to never hear from her again and I stopped that particular medication soon after, for obvious reasons.

Counselling services were also offered by the NHS at extremely irregular intervals and they had little benefit for me – although well-meaning, I felt the councillors just wanted to tick a few boxes and send me on my way. I’m lucky to have some great friends and family so finding someone to talk to wasn’t a problem, but finding someone to ‘fix’ me was.

Outside of the NHS, I went down the private route and found more of the same. All they were interested in was putting a sticking plaster over my wound, giving me some pills to make me feel better in the sort term and sending me on my way. Any attempt to delve deeper into the reasons for my mental health issues wasn’t welcomed at all; ‘Sounds like you’re a bit of a lazy tyke?’ I was told during one session at a very famous private mental health facility in Essex. I felt very deflated.

Fast-forward a few months and the desire to get better, to live a more fulfilling existence, was the main driver in my everyday life and this coincided with a conversation with a friend, who had a friend who’d been through something called The Thrive Programme and absolutely raved about it to anyone who’d listen. My research showed this wasn’t some fad or hippy treatment – as a journalist, I’m deeply cynical and disbelieving of anything that isn’t backed up by compelling factual evidence – so I called founder Rob Kelly and set up a meeting.

After an hour on Rob’s sofa chatting about learned helplessness, coping mechanisms, desire for control, managing thought patterns, developing resilience and positive outlooks, I felt that he actually understood the issues and I made more progress in this short time than in all the previous year’s put together.

Six sessions over six weeks later plus plenty of reading and homework, and I feel better than I have done in two decades. I have a new job that I wouldn’t trade for anything, I’m fitter and healthier than ever, my relationships with my family and friends are great and my mental health is following the same best-ever pattern. I feel like I can cope with anything – better than coping, I feel like I can sail through even a negative life experience and come out of the other side smiling and stronger still. This wasn’t the case a few months ago – the exact opposite was true.

The techniques I learnt through doing The Thrive Programme are based on Rob Kelly’s research and observations as a psychotherapist with 25 years’ experience and they form a refreshingly effective mental health tool kit with which to tackle life and prosper. He has a team of highly-trained consultants around the country who are able to offer the exact same service so, if I had a friend who was suffering in the same way I did for years, I wouldn’t hesitate to give The Thrive Programme my strongest personal recommendation. It’s changed my life and it could do the same for anyone, including you.

@thrivescotland @thriveprogramme @Thrive_Republic #MHAW17

If you suffer from depression, you must read this.

Depression help: Here is a blog post we’ve done for the main Thrive Programme website which is worth a few minutes of your time if you’d like

a) to know the truth about depression,

b) find a way to look at depression in a different more helpful (or hopeful) way, and

c) hear it from someone who beat his depression (or changed his thinking) via The Thrive Programme.

Most people suffering from depression and related conditions believe exactly as I did for many years; that there’s something fundamentally wrong with them. Some sort of misplaced connection that’s different to everyone else, like a badly-wired plug or a car with an intermittent fault that nobody else can experience or see but you.

BUT, I can tell you now with a great degree of certainty – informed by my own experience and that of many others who suffered from lifelong depression – that this isn’t the case.

Yes, your GP and NHS-based mental health practitioner will have explained how your brain chemistry is the mental equivalent of a school science experiment gone wrong because that’s the way that the general medical profession have viewed many mental health problems for decades. Their solution to this is to medicate. You break a leg and it’s obvious that your bone has physically snapped and needs to be put in plaster – thus, when you suffer from a mental health problem your brain must be chemically broken or damaged in the same way and needs fixing.

This isn’t true a lot of the time. As complex creatures, humans have become adept at creating these problems for ourselves through the way we process events and things that happen to us, even though we don’t do this consciously or with any awareness of what we’re doing. This is a well-established concept with considerable research behind it stretching back decades. Perhaps the best known and most compelling study on this subject was published in 1984 by Jerry M Burger, the highly respected professor of Psychology at Santa Clara University.

Jeremy Burger studied students over a six-month period and identified thinking styles and habits that led to mental health problems – for example, students who thought their lives were generally controlled by chance were most likely to have suicidal thoughts. It was also found that subjects with a high desire for control in their lives – manifesting itself in something like anxiety or OCD-type symptoms – who held external perceptions of control (i.e. they thought that their life is dictated by outside influences such as relationships or work) were most likely to seek nonprofessional help for depression.

Going further back, Beck (1972) proposed holding certain beliefs, such as a negative views of oneself, pessimism about the future, and interpretation of ongoing experiences in a negative manner, are responsible for many subsequent depressive episodes. Further studies by Abramson, Seligman, and Teasdale (1978), and Miller and Norman (1979) explored the relation between thought processes and depression.

In short, these and many more academic studies consistently link – what can loosely be described as – ‘unhelpful thought processes’ to many common mental health problems. There is little evidence of chemical imbalances or ‘faulty wiring’ being the actual cause.

So, the big question is: how does this all help you right now if you’re suffering from depression, anxiety or a similar condition? The good news is that your brain almost certainly isn’t broken, faulty or different to everyone else’s. The likelihood is that you’ve processed certain life events or experiences in a way that leads to feelings of helplessness, lack of control and negativity (see Beck’s 1972 list above) and subsequent depression, anxiety or similar mental health condition has then taken its grip. This is exactly what happened to me.

And because I created this problem, I’m the one who can fix it. And I’ve done just that.

Several months ago I found out about something called The Thrive Programme following a chance conversation with a friend. I made the call and signed up to see a Thrive Consultant immediately. When I began I was on two different types of medication prescribed by my well-meaning GP – a mood stabiliser and strong anti-depressant – and I’d also put on weight, had low self-esteem, no job, no home and generally not a lot going for me (or so I thought). My life was dominated by negative thought processes and I felt mentally ill – like the wiring in my brain was fundamentally broken or different to everyone else’s.

After the very first Thrive Programme training session (I had six in total) I felt much more in control. After the second session, I already noticed and improvement in my depression! Twelve weeks after starting the programme (six weeks after finishing it) I stopped taking my medication, and I haven’t messed it or needed it since.It’s now five months later and life couldn’t be better. The programme taught me how process past and current events effectively, and to think in such a way that I don’t allow negativity to creep in and begin that destructive cycle of unhelpful thought processes that van lead to depression – as identified by Berger et al.

The power of developing the kind of positive thinking and outlook taught by The Thrive Programme is highlighted in the graph below, which measures three key attributes before and after going through the course. The results speak for themselves.

I now feel equipped to deal with things that would’ve previously caused my mental health to suffer – I’m resilient, happy, productive and every aspect of my life has improved. The best thing is that, by using the techniques and strategies I learnt through Thrive, I’ve helped myself with no medication or therapists to prop me up. For the first time in recent memory, I feel ‘normal’, and I love it.

James R